Archive for June, 2010

Soupy Sales and more…

Posted by in |

Rogues’ Gallery has returned to the bestseller list at Book Soup, my favorite book store in Los Angeles (above). Also, this week, Crain’s New York Business references the book in its anniversary issue in a story on philanthropy as an economic engine by Miriam Kreinin Souccar, who describes the book as “a tell-all about power struggles behind the scenes at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

And on that note, adieu

Posted by in |

In a recent email exchange, the chief flack for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, charged that I was “averse to reason” when it comes to the museum I honor and the fascinating people whose lives are illuminated in the pages of Rogues’ Gallery. That led me to wonder if in fact it isn’t the museum’s administration and trustees who are averse to the beauty of truth. But enough. It’s almost summer, time to buy a few good books and chill in the heat. Here’s what independent experts said about Rogues’ Gallery. My advice? Decide for yourself. “Explosive.” — Vanity Fair … Continue reading

En garde, Goliath!

Posted by in |

Today, Jason Boog, editor of Galleycat, the book biz blog, asked me how I felt when I learned that Robert Silvers, eminence gris of the New York Review of Books, did indeed (as I speculate in the new afterword to Rogues’ Gallery) give an embargoed review copy of the book to Annette de la Renta, who promptly threatened to sue. My answer is here.

Montebello conquers Carnegie Hill

Posted by in |

Curbed has the scoop on former Metropolitan Museum of Art director Guy-Philippe Lannes de Montebello‘s new $1.75 million condo (bedroom above) at 40 East 94th Street on Carnegie Hill. Anywhere he hangs his art is home. Audio tour anyone?

Words to live (and die) by

Posted by in |

A friend found this prescription for the American cultural philanthropist, penned in 1881 but still relevant 129 years later. It comes from a review by James Jackson Jarves, the first significant American art connoisseur, of a memoir by a Florentine merchant, Un Mercante Fiorentina a La Sua Famiglia nel Secolo XV by Giovanni di Pagolo Rucellai, whose family paid for the marble facade by Alberti of Santa Maria Novella (above). “If we are to build up on American soil cities like Florence, world-renowned for art and science even more than for commerce and luxury, we must breed merchant princes cultured … Continue reading

“All the juice,” says Madame Arcati

Posted by in |

The UK’s maverick media blogger Madame Arcati just noted the arrival of the Rogues’ Gallery paperback. A certain Metropolitan Museum trustee, Arcati writes, “should be sending huge cheques to Michael for making her sound a lot more interesting than the gossip columns do, the silly bint.” That would be the same trustee George Gurley dubbed an “awe-inspiring badass” (see below). There’s more from the antic Arcati here.

Which Met Museum trustee is “an awe-inspiring badass”?

Posted by in |

The New York Observer’s George Gurley profiles me and proves he’s quite a rogue himself in tomorrow’s paper.

With love from Met to you…

Posted by in |

The Metropolitan Museum has announced a continuation of its Met Holiday Mondays program, opening portions of the museum to the public on the day of the week it is usually closed to all but invited press, trustees and special friends. Of course, on holiday weekends, the privileged flee, so it’s unlikely you’ll run into the likes of Jayne Wrightsman or Henry Kissinger, but Talleyrand and Madame X will prove acceptable replacements to most.