Archive for May, 2019

Two Jewish Boys, One Honeypot

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Tomorrow’s New York Times Book Review includes a sketch of a book published last month about the war over the web domain sex.com, pitting an internet entrepreneur named Gary Kremen against the conman who stole it from him, Steven Michael Cohen (shown as I confront him in Tijuana, Mexico). The reviewer calls the book “reductive,” but the story is, please pardon the expression, a sexy one. Should you want to read a lively reduction of its essence, I covered it for Playboy some fifteen years ago in a story titled “The Taking of Sex.com,” and you can read it here.

Dining with the Disgraceful

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I’m quoted in an essay on creepy society comebacks in the new issue of Town & Country. Read Horacio Silva‘s article here. Thge illustration is reminiscent of the cover I commissioned for last fall’s Avenue magazine Power issue.

Tattered Trump Tales

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Last night, in a commentary on Donald Trump‘s tax-dodging, Samantha Bee resurrected a clip from a 2003 doc in which Ivanka Trump recalled encountering a beggar with her father in the early 1990s. Apparently, this is a Trump family schtick, because her father told me the same story about four years earlier, only then, he was walking down the street (a dubious notion by itself) not with Ivanka but with his second wife, Marla. Compare and contrast Ivanka’s story with an unedited section of the transcript of that interview after the jump. IVANKA (2003): “I remember once my father and … Continue reading

“The Avenue’s Most Exclusive Address” –New York Times

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Looks like Park Avenue is the focus of the New York Times Real Estate section’s weekly “Living In” feature this weekend. And 740 Park gets the requisite name check. Thanks for that, C.J. Hughes.

Rogues’ Gallery: A Decade of Delinquency

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Rogues’ Gallery was published ten years ago today and remains both banned in the bookstore of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, its focus, and pointedly relevant, as last month’s death of longtime museum trustee Jayne Wrightsman, and this week’s frenzy over the Costume Institute’s annual gala, aka the Party of the Year, demonstrate. I think of the book as my favorite child, the one that caused the most trouble, was deemed a delinquent, and thus, merits extra love–my little James Dean, you might say, only this rebel had a cause: Highlighting how the wealthy use culture and philanthropy to launder … Continue reading